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TIFF 2017: Louis C.K. Courts Controversy With His New ‘Secret’ Film | Screen News

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Louis C.K. at the world premiere of his "secret" film I Love You, Daddy - TIFF

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  • Louis C.K. at the world premiere of his “secret” film I Love You, Daddy

That Louis C.K. didn’t tell his publicist he had written, directed and starred in a film or that he was screening at the 2017 Toronto International Film Festival is the least provocative thing about I Love You, Daddy.


Tongues are already wagging over C.K.’s comedy (shot on 35mm black-and-while film), and it’s a good bet the buzz will get even louder when the movie hits theaters (there’s no official release date yet). After the premiere, C.K. told the media he wants his film to be screened at traditional cinemas, which is a little old-school for this artist who has showcased some of his best work, including the brilliant Horace and Pete, on his own website.

In I Love You, Daddy, Chloe Grace Moretz plays China, the 17-year-old daughter of successful TV producer, Glen (C.K.). China is in a relationship with a 68-year-old movie director (John Malkovich), who has been accused of rape and pedophilia. As the two of them leave for Paris, Glen feels he hasn’t done a great job as a parent. Add in dialogue containing unprintable words, and you get one of the most controversial comedies in recent memory.

During his time in Toronto, C.K. tried to dodge questions from the media, including The New York Times, about a Daily Beast article in which comedian/actor Tig Notaro said C.K. needs to address sexual-misconduct allegations made against him by female comedians. 


“They’re rumors, that’s all that is,” C.K. ultimately told The New York Times, saying I Love You, Daddy also ventures into a world of rumor and innuendo. “I made a movie that totally walks all over that electric fence.”

As I exited the world premiere public screening of I Love You, Daddy, I heard as many people say, “I loved that movie,” as I heard, “That was disturbing.” The Los Angeles Times has already written that the film “strikes the third rail of intergenerational romance.”


Do I want you to see this film? You bet I do. This movie deserves a robust conversation, and it’s destined to get one.



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